Course Descriptions

Below is a list in alphabetical order of all courses offered through Pennsylvania's LTAP. Each course listing includes a description of the course and the program it belongs to. The course code is also supplied for easy lookup.

  • A


    • RS-S12-C1 ROAD SCHOLAR

      The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) prohibits discrimination based upon disability. Title II of the act focuses on public accommodations and states that “barriers to access” are considered discrimination. A curb that prohibits a wheelchair from accessing a sidewalk, for example, is a barrier to access and is therefore discrimination. Also under the ADA, all new construction must meet the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines, which are part of the Code of Federal Regulations. While the spirit of the ADA is clear, the application of its specific requirements to local roadway maintenance and operations can be complex. What constitutes new construction within the ADA Accessibility Guidelines? Certainly, the placement of sidewalk in a new residential development is considered new construction, but what about the replacement of a deteriorated segment of sidewalk or the repaving of a local road? This course helps to answer questions like these, as well as provides specifics about planning, design, construction, and materials useful to municipal public works employees. Intended audience: All public works employees involved with ADA transportation facilities, including municipal decision makers such as managers, foremen, codes inspectors, and zoning officers, and road crew members with ADA facility responsibilities. Engineers are welcome to attend, but the focus is on the non-engineer.


    • RS-M03-A1 ROAD SCHOLAR

      This course provides relevant information to individuals who have to maintain asphalt pavements. The course material reviews the importance of preventive maintenance to the life of an asphalt pavement. The material will help the student identify common asphalt distress, the cause of the distress, and the appropriate treatments. The latest techniques, materials, and equipment will be reviewed with an emphasis on repairing the asphalt distress properly the first time. Current industry standards to properly repair problems such as cracking and potholes will be presented in detail. The basics of treatments such as seal coats, micro surfacing, and overlays will be presented. A review of the latest treatments included in Penn DOT Publication 447 Approved Products for Lower Volume Local Roads, will be covered. Intended Audience: Individuals who are involved in the planning and execution of maintenance work on asphalt pavements, including: street superintendents, roadmasters, public works directors, foreman, and select crew members.

  • B


    • RS2-M20-A2 ROAD SCHOLAR 2

      This program identifies the responsibilities of municipalities that own bridges, particularly spans less than 20 feet. Knowledge of preventive maintenance practices for preserving bridges will be discussed. A review of Bridge Inspection Reports with emphasis on maintenance recommendations will be presented. Intended Audience: Individuals who are involved in the maintenance of locally owned bridges (particularly spans less than 20 feet), including: elected officials, public works directors, roadmasters and bridge foremen/crew leaders.

  • C


    • RS2-S15-C1 ROAD SCHOLAR 2

      The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has established new rules about traffic sign maintenance, asset management, and retroreflectivity standards. The LTAP Conducting Sign Retroreflectivity Inspections course will instruct municipal staff on these requirements, reinforce the value of a useful traffic sign asset management system, and demonstrate the tools and techniques available for measuring traffic sign retroreflectivity. Further, the course will present the concepts of luminance and retroreflectivity, providing a foundation for understanding the value of certain testing and measuring methods. Intended Audience: Local government officials responsible for installation, maintenance, and inspection of traffic signs, roadway safety, and asset management. This includes traffic technicians, public works directors, supervisors, roadmasters, and crew responsible for traffic signs.


    • RS2-S16-C1 ROAD SCHOLAR 2

      Part of a series of courses about traffic signing, this course will provide students with information about curve safety and the application of horizontal alignment signs for curved segments of local roads. Based upon national and state standards, the course will cover: • Curve Warning sign details and applications • Curve Warning sign placement and installation criteria • Curve study components and safety The course will focus on studies for determining the application of curve warning signs and other safety features for curves. The course will also examine other features germane to curve safety, including pavement quality, superelevation, shoulder edge drop-offs, clear zones, and fixed object hazards. Students will be able to explore the application of curve warning signs through several real examples, including a field visit to nearby curved roadway segments.

  • D


    • RS-M04-A2 ROAD SCHOLAR

      This course covers the affect water has on roadways. Emphasis is on problems caused by poor drainage with discussion on various ways to handle these problems. Basic roadway drainage systems and their usage are reviewed. Industry standard procedures for replacing cross pipes are presented in detail. Regulatory agency policies and permit requirements are presented. The importance of performing routine inspection of drainage system assets is discussed with emphasis on the relationship to planning and Federal Aid reimbursement in the case of a disaster. Intended Audience: Individuals who are involved in the planning and execution of maintenance work on asphalt pavements, including: street superintendents, roadmasters, public works directors, crew foremen, and select crew members.

  • E


    • RS-S06-C2 ROAD SCHOLAR

      How do you legally establish speed limits on municipal roads? How do you properly place Stop signs? What are the problems associated with improper use of multiway Stop signs? This course answers these questions and more, by demonstrating how to conduct basic engineering and traffic studies for establishment of regulatory signs on municipal roads. It reviews applicable laws, ordinances, regulations and required study procedures for establishing, revising and removing traffic restrictions, as presented in PennDOT Publication 212, Official Traffic Control Devices. Participants also complete exercises in which they perform common engineering and traffic studies using real data. Intended Audience: Individuals conducting engineering and traffic studies and those responsible for identifying safety problems and potential solutions including: law enforcement personnel, roadmasters, and street superintendents. Others who would benefit from this course include: elected officials, public works employees. Engineers are welcome to attend, but the focus is on the non-engineer.


    • RS-M14-A1 ROAD SCHOLAR

      This course provides a basic understanding of common safety factors and practices associated with public works road maintenance operations. Specific operations discussed include trench excavation, crack sealing with hot asphalt, mowing and chain saw use, as well as winter maintenance. It provides and overview of why accidents happen and how to protect personnel through the use of personal protective equipment. Work place awareness is stressed with emphasis on chemical safety, environmental hazards and vehicle and equipment safety issues. The importance of having a formal safety program in place and how to establish an effective program is discussed. Intended Audience: Individuals who are performing maintenance, construction, or traffic control on municipal roadways including: roadmasters, crew foremen, equipment operators and laborers. Others who would benefit from this course include: municipal managers and elected officials to understand the importance and for budgeting purposes.

  • F


    • RS-M15-A1 ROAD SCHOLAR

      This course provides formal training in this operation to supplement the specifications that were incorporated into the PennDOT Publication 447, Approved Products for Lower Volume Local Roads. Full Depth Reclamation provides local government agencies with another operation to consider when planning road and street projects. This process recycles existing pavement materials saving energy and valuable resources. The participants will be able to identify typical roadway distress that can be addressed by Full Depth Reclamation. The various types of the Full Depth Reclamation process will be described. The latest techniques, material and equipment will be reviewed to assist the participants in project design for planning purposes. The operational sequence of performing this activity will be presented. Intended Audience: Local government officials responsible for asset management, project planning, and inspection of roadway improvement projects. This includes Public Works Directors, Supervisors, Road Masters and Foremen.

  • G


    • RS-M05-A1 ROAD SCHOLAR

      This course identifies various types of geosynthetic materials used in road maintenance operations. Attendees will gain the knowledge and understanding of the common types of geosynthetic materials as well as their applications and functions. Instructors will review the cost benefits in using geosynthetics in the preventive maintenance of roadway structures. Such uses of geosynthetics as subsurface drainage, subgrade stabilization, soil reinforcement, erosion and sedimentation control, and paving fabric will also be discussed. Intended Audience: Individuals who are involved in the planning and execution of maintenance work on asphalt pavements, including: elected officials, public works directors, roadmasters, crew foremen, and select crew members.

  • I


    • RS-S08-C2 ROAD SCHOLAR

      This course provides participants with 1) a basic understanding of intersection safety issues, 2) “How to” information for common safety tasks and low cost safety improvements that do not require an engineer, and 3) background information on safety tasks that DO require an engineer. This workshop also outlines areas where non-engineers can assist traffic engineers in the safety process, and help them to understand when an engineer needs to be consulted to make a safety related change at an intersection. This workshop is only intended to address existing roads; proposed roads are not considered because it is assumed that an engineer will be involved in design and planning of those. This program is not intended to make traffic engineers out of the general public. Intended Audience: Individuals conducting engineering and traffic studies and those responsible for identifying safety problems and potential solutions including: law enforcement personnel, roadmasters, and street superintendents. Others who would benefit from this course include: elected officials, public works employees municipal managers. Engineers are welcome to attend, but the focus is on the non-engineer.

  • M


    • RS-M08-A1 ROAD SCHOLAR

      One of the most aggravating occurrences undermining the structural stability of a newly reconstructed or resurfaced road is the utility repair cut. This course covers the management of roadway excavations by contractors and utilities through local ordinances, permits, fees, specifications and inspection. It compares local ordinances with state procedures for state roads. It also discusses PA One Call, trenching and shoring, work zone traffic control, and liability. Intended Audience: Individuals who are involved in the ordinance, permitting, and monitoring process to effectively manage utility excavations on locally owned roads and streets, including: elected officials, public works directors, road masters, foremen, and select crew members.

  • P


    • RS-S11-C1 ROAD SCHOLAR

      The consistent application and maintenance of pavement markings are paramount to motorists` safety. This course covers all aspects of pavement markings from their purpose and intent to their installation and maintenance on roadways. Content is based on the Federal Highway Administration`s Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) and the most current Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) practices, regulations and resources. Participants will discuss and learn more about materials, applications, installation, and maintenance of pavement markings. Intended Audience: Roadmasters, public works directors, engineers, maintenance personnel, street supervisors, and any other individuals involved with the design, installation, and maintenance of pavement markings within their jurisdiction. Others who would benefit from this course include: elected officials, public works employees, municipal managers. Engineers are welcome to attend, but the focus is on the non-engineer.


    • RS-M18-A1 ROAD SCHOLAR

      This LTAP course will teach the proper planning and execution of two important pavement preservation techniques: Micro-Surfacing and Ultra-Thin Friction Course. Local government agencies will be provided information on selecting the correct treatment to the appropriate pavement at the right time to extend the useful life of roadways. The course will cover the requirements of PennDOT specifications, proper pavement selection, project planning, and operational oversight of successful projects. Intended Audience: Local government officials responsible for asset management, project planning, oversight, and inspection of roadway improvement projects. This includes public works directors, supervisors, roadmasters, and foremen.


    • RS-M02-A1 ROAD SCHOLAR

      Many rural roads and urban streets were not built to carry today’s heavy loads. This course reviews laws governing posting and bonding, requirements for developing and implementing a posting and bonding program, and ways to monitor a program. Participants examine a sample bonding agreement. Intended Audience: Individuals responsible for posting weight limits on municipal roadways and issuing permits to haul in excess of those weight limits including: elected officials, municipal secretaries, roadmasters, and street superintendents. Others who would benefit from this course include: law enforcement personnel, engineers, and municipal managers


    • RS-M13-A2 ROAD SCHOLAR

      A CALCULATOR IS NECESSARY FOR THIS COURSE. This course provides an understanding of practical applications for performing estimates on typical construction and maintenance projects. Various mathematical rules necessary to perform basic computations and formulas to perform cost and quantity calculations are reviewed. The participants perform material estimating, problem solving, and dealing with cost and quantity estimates. Intended Audience: Individuals who are involved in collecting roadway measurements and compiling estimates for roadway maintenance and construction projects, including: public works employees such as street supervisors, directors, and roadmasters.


    • RS2-M21-A1 ROAD SCHOLAR 2

      This half-day course will provide training to help ensure local government maintenance projects are done in a manner to achieve maximum quality and longevity by providing the participants with the information needed to monitor these projects. Projects such as Liquid Bituminous Seal Coat, Asphalt Paving, Micro-Surfacing and Nova Chip require attention to detail to ensure a successful project. This course is intended to provide the participants the critical elements of these operations that need monitored so the life expectancy is achieved. Intended Audience: Individuals responsible for performing roadway inventory and condition surveys as well as planning and programming functions such as: public works directors, street supervisors, roadmasters and crew foremen.

  • R


    • RS-S04-C1 ROAD SCHOLAR

      This course is directed at the importance of maintenance crews and their operations in reducing municipal liability. The course helps participants understand and assess their major liability exposures by identifying high tort areas in roadway activities. It explains tort liability and the tort trial process, and presents the basics of implementing and maintaining a risk management program. Intended Audience: As this course is directed at the importance of roadways and roadway maintenance operations in reducing municipal liability, the primary audience is everyone involved in municipal roadways. This includes: public works employees, roadmasters, street superintendents, elected officials, law enforcement personnel, municipal managers, engineers.


    • RS2-S19-C2 ROAD SCHOLAR 2

      The new full day course for municipal officials who want to improve the overall safety of their roads will find the Road Safety Audit (RSA) is a good tool for meeting their goals. Conducted through a formal process, an RSA ends with a report and plan to improve safety for all road users. These audits can be completed quickly in the hopes of identifying potential safety issues before crashes occur. Municipalities may conduct road safety audits on existing roads and intersections or during any phase of project development, from planning and preliminary engineering through design and construction. Intended Audience: This course is intended for local government officials responsible for the installation, maintenance, and inspection of traffic signs, roadway safety, and asset management. This includes traffic technicians, public works directors, supervisors, roadmasters, and crews responsible for traffic signs.


    • RS-M10-A2 ROAD SCHOLAR

      This course provides the basics for developing a road surface management program to help local governments manage their pavements by providing an understanding of the concept and importance of road surface inventories and condition surveys. A review of the basic components of flexible and rigid pavements is discussed. Pavement condition evaluations and how to recognize common pavement distress is presented. Sample pavement ratings are performed by the participants. Repair strategies at the system and project level are discussed using the information presented in the course. Intended Audience: Individuals responsible for performing roadway inventory and condition surveys as well as planning and programming functions such as: public works directors, street supervisors, roadmasters and crew foremen.


    • RS-S09-C2 ROAD SCHOLAR

      Roadside Safety Features will provide information and resources for municipalities to understand the importance of roadside safety and to be able to determine the most appropriate countermeasures. This class is not a design class but will focus on practical applications of roadside safety concepts. For example, it will follow the common theme for roadside hazard identification and improvement: hazard removal, relocation, make breakaway, shield, and delineate. Therefore, it will cover low cost improvements (pavement markings, delineators, chevrons) and higher cost (barriers). Information on guiderail warrants, types, and end treatments will be presented. Intended Audience: Individuals responsible for maintaining roadsides and identifying safety problems and potential solutions, including: roadmasters, street superintendents, public works employees. Others who would benefit from this course include: law enforcement personnel, and elected officials. This is not a design class, so engineers are welcome to attend, but the focus is on the non-engineer.


    • RS-M07-A2 ROAD SCHOLAR

      This course provides the knowledge and understanding needed to establish an efficient and effective roadside vegetation control program. It is based on the concept of an Integrated Vegetation Management philosophy that utilizes manual, mechanical, and chemical control methods to manage roadside vegetation. It also reviews laws and regulations regarding required applicator certification. Due to the emphasis placed on chemical application, this course has been approved by the Pa. Department of Agriculture for Continuing Education Unit credits for those who have received pesticide applicator certification. Certified applicators can receive 3 core credits and 6 credits in each of the following categories: 10, 18, 23, upon successful completion of this course. Intended Audience: Individuals who are certified pesticide applicators and registered technicians. Public works employees in charge of managing roadside vegetation programs who are interested in using chemical applications in their program should also attend

  • S


    • RS-S13-C1 ROAD SCHOLAR

      This course is intended for drivers of municipal vehicles. Recognizing that the cause of the majority of crashes is driver error, the course encourages the development of safe driving behaviors through an understanding of three phases of the driving task, completing a pre-trip vehicle inspection, and work site vehicle operation. The course is presented with these trainee objectives: Learn that the driving task requires a commitment to being as safe as possible; Recognize the messages being communicated through traffic control devices; Use new techniques to drive as safely as possible. After an introduction to the importance of developing safe driving behaviors, the course focuses on recognizing traffic control devices, including signs, pavement markings, temporary traffic control, and the contribution of these devices to driver expectancy. After a section describing driving skills and awareness, the course leads trainees through a discussion of specific driving situations to reinforce trainee driving skills and awareness. While these first four modules of the course are useful to all drivers, including those using municipal cars, the course`s final instructional module focuses on the specific needs of equipment operators and CDL holders. Intended audience: Any employee who operates municipal and public works vehicles.


    • RS2-M19-A2 ROAD SCHOLAR 2

      This course covers all aspects of winter maintenance operations. Topics include planning and organizing, public relations, material usage and application rates, equipment types and calibration as well as various operational procedures such as plowing and spreading. Other topics include CDL regulations, safety and environmental awareness. Also covered are the latest techniques in pre-wetting materials and anti-icing procedures for a more effective and economical operations. Intended Audience: All public works employees engaged in winter maintenance operations including: Street supervisors, public works directors, roadmasters, crew foremen and equipment operators.


    • RS-S14-C1 ROAD SCHOLAR

      The LTAP Signs and Safety Features for Bridges/Culverts course will demonstrate the importance of effective and consistent signs, pavement markings, and delineation in advance of and at bridges/culverts. The course will discuss the regulations governing signing, pavement markings, and other traffic control devices (TCDs) and will explain the application and placement of TCDs. The course will also describe the different types of safety features (such as guide rail and other barriers) at bridges/culverts. Students will learn about the warrants for the use of the safety features, placement criteria, and end treatments. Intended Audience: Local government officials responsible for roadway safety, asset management, project planning, and inspection of roadway improvement projects. This includes public works directors, supervisors, roadmasters, and foremen.


    • EVENT EVENT

      Any special event attended by an LTAP representative (e.g., speaking engagements, displaying at special shows, etc.).


    • RS2-S18-C1 ROAD SCHOLAR 2

      The half-day course will employ newly developed material, focusing on the investigation and decision-making processes associated with managing vehicular speed. The participants will: Review speed safety statistics and how to identify problem areas, Discuss how to study a roadway segment for speed issues and determine changes in speed limit postings, Recognize common safety issues and learn to apply proven mitigation measures. Intended Audience: This course is intended for local government officials responsible for the installation, maintenance, and inspection of traffic signs, roadway safety, and asset management. This includes traffic technicians, public works directors, supervisors, roadmasters, and crew responsible for traffic signs.


    • RS2-S17-C1 ROAD SCHOLAR 2

      Part of the LTAP’s new series of courses on signing and safety, this course focuses on STOP signs and other controls that improve safety at unsignalized intersections. Beginning with reasons for effectively implementing STOP sign placement, course content will examine the components of STOP sign placement, as well as offering suggestions for accommodating uncommon challenges. In addition to STOP signs, the course will present content on other safety features often used at intersections along with signs such as pavement markings and rumble strips. The course will also offer content on common STOP intersection problems such as unwarranted STOP signs and multi-way STOP intersections. The methodology for studying an intersection to warrant STOP signs is included, along with a Workshop, during which participants will be challenged with an example problem and given an opportunity to work through a study to determine the best tools for intersection safety.


    • RS-M09-A1 ROAD SCHOLAR

      The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) and local municipalities have a variety of requirements that detail how the rate, volume and velocity of stormwater runoff are to be managed. This course reviews these regulations and the resulting requirements for the operation and maintenance of stormwater management facilities. The course provides an overview of the storm runoff process; a discussion of current regulatory requirements for new development as well as municipal obligations under National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) municipal storm sewer system (MS4) permits; identifies elements of sustainable stormwater management systems; and discusses operation and maintenance of stormwater facilities. Intended Audience: Individuals who are involved in establishing local stormwater policies, reviewing development plans, inspecting construction of stormwater facilities, and operation and maintenance of stormwater facilities, including: elected officials, planners, public works directors, engineers, and operations and maintenance personnel.

  • T


    • RS-S07-C2 ROAD SCHOLAR

      This course introduces an engineering tool whose purpose is to address excessive traffic speed and/or cut-through traffic on residential streets. The course provides information that can help municipalities establish a rational traffic calming program for their roadways. Detailing information in PennDOT’s Publication 383, Pennsylvania’s Traffic Calming Handbook, the course defines traffic calming, describes various traffic calming devices, outlines potential positive and negative impacts on a neighborhood, and reviews a sample traffic calming program. It also investigates related issues, such as impacts of traffic calming devices on liability, roadway maintenance, and emergency service. Participants perform case studies, applying traffic calming measures to address traffic concerns. Intended Audience: Individuals who receive complaints about speeding and cut through traffic and want to respond appropriately to address these problems, including: law enforcement personnel municipal managers, elected officials, planners, roadmasters, and street superintendents. Others who would benefit from this course include: public works employees. Engineers are welcome to attend, but the focus is on the non-engineer.


    • RS-S16-C1 ROAD SCHOLAR

      This course serves as the foundational course in a series of new LTAP courses about traffic signs. The course will begin with discussing the function and purpose of signs from a more philosophical perspective; that of the driving task and how signs affect driving and road safety. After a review of the national and state standards that govern signs, the course will return to describe the function and purpose of signs, but from a more technical perspective. This technical section is the longest section of the course, and will follow the MUTCD, Part 2, Chapter 2A, giving participants a basic understanding of the information available to them in this important document. After reviewing the design and placement of signs, the course will move to a brief section on traffic signs for low-volume roadways, and then finally review the responsibilities associated with maintaining safe signing in your municipality. Intended Audience: This course is intended for local government officials responsible for the installation, maintenance, and inspection of traffic signs, roadway safety, and asset management. This includes traffic technicians, public works directors, supervisors, roadmasters, and crew responsible for traffic signs.

  • U


    • RS-M11-A1 ROAD SCHOLAR

      This course addresses basic maintenance techniques for unpaved and gravel roads. Topics include the importance of good drainage, surface aggregate and dust control materials, and operational techniques. These techniques include blading, reshaping, regraveling and dust control. Driving Surface Aggregate (DSA) specifications and use are reviewed. Factors used to determine when to upgrade a gravel road by paving or seal coating the roadway are discussed. Intended Audience: Individuals involved in the maintenance of unpaved or gravel roadways such as: Street supervisors, roadmasters, crew foremen, and equipment operators. This class does not qualify a municipality to obtain dirt and gravel road funds, but rather teaches them how to better use such funds.

  • W


    • RS-S03-C1 ROAD SCHOLAR

      This course identifies the work zone set-up requirements, traffic control devices, and flagging procedures through a review of the regulations in PennDOT Publication 213, Temporary Traffic Control Guidelines, and the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). The course covers development of traffic control plans, use of typical layout figures from the publication, and inspection of established work zones. The course emphasizes teaching work zone traffic control guidelines and set-ups for typical municipal work, from grading a gravel road to painting crosswalk lines to repairing pavement. Intended Audience: Individuals who are performing maintenance, construction, or traffic control on municipal roadways including: public works employees, roadmasters and street superintendents. Others who would benefit from this course include: law enforcement personnel (for enforcement purposes), municipal managers and elected officials (to understand the importance and for budgeting purposes). Engineers are welcome to attend, but the focus is on the non-engineer. Handouts: Attendees MUST bring a copy of PennDOT Publication 213 —Temporary Traffic Control Guidelines (June 2014 edition) to the class. http://www.dot.state.pa.us/public/PubsForms/Publications/PUB%20213.pdf